Grains for Every Season: Rethinking Our Way with Grains

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From the Publisher

Grains for Every SeasonGrains for Every Season

Transform the way you cook with barley, brown rice, buckwheat, corn, millet, oats, quinoa, rye, wheat, and wild rice

Quinoa Watermelon Salad

Quinoa Watermelon Salad

Lamb and Bulghur Meatballs

Lamb and Bulghur Meatballs

Chocolate Oat Layer Cake

Chocolate Oat Layer Cake

Quinoa and Watermelon Salad with Pistachios and Spicy Pickled Peppers

This recipe is dead simple but so satisfying. The tender texture of quinoa plays nicely with watermelon’s unique soft-but-crunchy consistency, and it soaks up all the tangy-sweet juices, making every bite flavor-packed. This salad is also delicious with cantaloupe or another melon instead of watermelon.

Lamb and Bulgur Meatballs in Lemony Yogurt Sauce

Bulgur keeps the texture of these meatballs light and tender, and adds more nutritional value. Meatballs freeze beautifully, giving you a complex dinner in minutes. I shape my meatballs, arrange them on a parchment-lined sheet pan, and then freeze the raw meatballs “naked” until quite firm. Then I pile them into a good freezer container or bag.

Super Fudgy Chocolate Oat Layer Cake with Chocolate Oat Milk Frosting

This cake’s layers are very moist and will be quite fragile, especially if you accidentally underbake them. But the fudgy frosting is there to cover any mishaps, so if your layers rip, just piece them back together as you assemble the cake and know that they will taste perfect. The cake is gorgeous as is, but you can finish it with a sprinkle of toasted rolled oats.

saucing a pizzasaucing a pizza

Joshua’s Four Rules of Pizza Making

I take pizza very seriously, as it is one of humankind’s greatest inventions. Making pizza at home is often disappointing because, with a normal home oven, people just can’t achieve a crust like the one at a good pizzeria—chewy-crisp with the right amount of char on the edges—and they end up with pizzas that are cardboard-y. That’s because it’s not possible to get the high heat and thermal capacity of a wood-burning masonry oven by using a home oven. So I say forget about Neapolitan-style pizza and make a sheet pan pizza. You can use the same types of toppings and the crust is equally delicious, just different—slightly thick, meaning you get a lot of delicious whole-grain flavor.

Here are my four rules to keep in mind as you make pizza:

1. Do not oversauce your pizza. Pizza is about the dough; the sauce should just be an accent. No soggy pizzas, please.

dressing a pizzadressing a pizza

Joshua’s Four Rules of Pizza Making

2. Do not use more than three main ingredients for your toppings (other than extra-virgin olive oil and some grated Parmigiano). The concept will just be muddled.

checking the crustchecking the crust

Joshua’s Four Rules of Pizza Making

3. Bake your pizza hotter and longer than you think you should. You want your toppings to get good and browned for the most flavor and the bottom crust must be cooked and crisp.

oil on pizzaoil on pizza

Joshua’s Four Rules of Pizza Making

4. Once the pizza is out of the oven, finish with a drizzle of olive oil and a big pinch of flaky salt as the final flourish.

saucing a pizzasaucing a pizza

dressing a pizzadressing a pizza

checking the crustchecking the crust

oil on pizzaoil on pizza

crispy quinoa tempura two wayscrispy quinoa tempura two ways

Makes enough to coat about 1 pound (450 g) of vegetables

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, quinoa, baking powder, cornstarch, and kosher salt to blend thoroughly.

Whisk in enough sparkling water to make a thin batter.

To use: Cut your ingredients into even pieces. Cut dense vegetables thin, so they will cook fully before the batter burns.

Line a plate or tray with a double layer of paper towels. Fill a medium or large saucepan or deep skillet with about 2 inches (5 cm) of vegetable oil and heat to 365°F (185°C).

Dip your ingredient in the batter and hold it over the bowl for a few seconds so the excess can drip off. Carefully lower into the hot oil and fry until the ingredient is fully cooked and the batter is crisp and deep golden brown; the timing will depend on the density of the ingredient. If the batter is browning deeply before the item is cooked, lower the oil temperature and try again.

Drain on paper towels, sprinkle with flaky salt, and serve right away, while crisp and hot, with lemon wedges and sauces on the side.

Crispy Quinoa “Tempura,” for Vegetables

Give traditional batter even more crunch by adding uncooked quinoa, which pops during frying. This vegetable-specific batter employs rice flour along with whole wheat flour to create an exceptionally light crust. I like to use sparkling water for extra lightness, but plain tap water will give you perfectly fine results. Make the batter right before you’re ready to fry as it doesn’t hold well.

Ingredients

1⅔ cups (200 g) whole wheat flour

⅔ cup (100 g) rice flour

½ cup (90 g) uncooked red quinoa

2 tablespoons cornstarch

½ teaspoon kosher salt

1½ cups (360 ml) sparkling water

Flaky salt, lemon wedges, Turmeric Mayo, and Tzatziki, for serving

Publisher ‏ : ‎ Artisan (November 23, 2021)
Language ‏ : ‎ English
Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 368 pages
ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 157965956X
ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1579659561
Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 3.1 pounds
Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 7.5 x 1.5 x 10.25 inches

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